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About

Mission

Notre Dame High School’s mission as a Catholic school ministry in the Diocese of San Bernardino is to prepare students for college in the finest Catholic tradition, grounded in faith, active in scholarship, and engaged in community.


Pillars

Notre Dame’s shared values are derived directly from our mission and are exemplified in our three pillars of Faith, Scholarship, and Community.  Our Intended Student Outcomes (ISO’s) are directly derived from our three pillars.  

Faith

Notre Dame High School follows the example of Our Lady whose life is rooted in the values of the Gospel, the example of Jesus Christ, and the tradition of the Catholic Church.  The Notre Dame community strives to live as models of Christ, spreading the good news of the Gospel through our actions and our words.

Scholarship

Notre Dame High School is dedicated to excellence in education with a holistic approach of educating the mind, developing the body, and enriching the spirit. We are a dedicated community of scholars in the pursuit of knowledge beyond the classroom walls, preparing our students for admission to college, success in college course-work, and success in life.

Community

Through transformational community service we will model the servant leadership of Christ while helping the less fortunate and educating our students in social justice issues.  We are a small-school community which supports one another in the pursuit of our mission, vision, and shared values, and which values our role in the larger educational community of the Riverside region.

One Heart, One Spirit

Notre Dame’s Catholic identity is rooted in our charism, Cor Unum et Anima Una, One Heart and One Spirit, referenced in Acts 4:32: “The full number of those who believed were of one heart and soul and no one said that any of the things that belonged to him were his own but they had everything in common;” and again in 1 Corinthians 12:12: “For just as the body is one and has many members, and all the members of the body, though many, are one body, so it is with Christ.”  Notre Dame believes that a student’s God-given gifts must be identified, nurtured and shared with the larger community, and that our role is to provide as many opportunities as possible for each student to achieve excellence in mind, body, and spirit.

Core Values

Notre Dame recognizes the parents’ primary role in the education and formation of their student and strives to complement that role through a strong professional partnership grounded in the understanding that God is the reason for our school.  Through the parent partnership we work to further all students’ development of their God-given talents guiding them to their fullest potential.  In line with our mission, our goal is to prepare students for a successful college career and a successful life as Catholic adults.

Vision

Notre Dame will continually strive to be the most unique, engaging, and effective learning environment in Inland Southern California and beyond.

Notre Dame High School’s classrooms will be student-centered, technology-enhanced, academically-strong, innovative learning environments.  

Notre Dame instructors will be innovative designers of engaging assignments motivating students in the pursuit of knowledge and understanding in a rich Catholic environment.

History

Notre Dame is a coeducational, secondary school originally founded in 1956 by the Most Reverend Charles F. Buddy, Bishop of the Diocese of San Diego, as a Diocesan secondary school for boys. The first Principal was the Rev. J.V. Sullivan, a Diocesan priest. In 1957 the administration of the school was taken over by the Holy Ghost Fathers, who staffed Notre Dame until 1971, at which time plans were made to merge Notre Dame with St. Francis de Sales Girls High School.  Under the direction of the Most Reverend Leo T. Maher, Bishop of the Diocese of San Diego, the present school was started in 1971.

In 1978, the Diocese of San Diego was divided and the new Diocese of San Bernardino was created with the Most Reverend Philip F. Straling as its first Bishop.  Since the formation of the new Diocese, Notre Dame has become a tuition-based, self-sufficient high school with an enrollment of approximately 500 students.

The most Reverend Gerald Barnes assumed the pastoral leadership of the Diocese of San Bernardino in 1996 as the Diocese’s second Bishop.  Under the leadership of Bishop Gerald Barnes, Notre Dame adopted the President/Principal leadership model in 2011 with the appointment of Robert Beatty as Notre Dame’s first President.  Matthew M. Luttringer was selected in 2012 as the first Principal under the new leadership model. 

President/Principal Leadership Team

The President/Principal model is a partnership between the President, who provides organizational leadership through a clear mission and a shared strategic vision, and the Principal who is empowered by the President to provide educational leadership on a day to day basis to achieve the school's mission in pursuit of the shared vision.

President

The President is the head of the school's Leadership Team and is responsible to the Bishop and the Superintendent of Catholic Schools for the overall advancement of the school's mission, vision, and strategic initiatives, partnering with the school's Principal to ensure the success of the school's learning environments;

The President is responsible for the school's finances and the fiscal health of the school, establishes the organization's operating budget, implements fiscal polices and procedures, and ensures stewardship of resources; Strategic visioning, future driven, programs, enrollment, etc.

The President is responsible for the overall advancement efforts and resource development of the school, identifies and pursues relationships with individuals and organizations willing to support the strategic vision and advance the mission of the school through philanthropic giving, and acts as the schools brand manager responsible for the marketing, advertising, and communication of the schools brand image;

The President is responsible for engaging the larger community and for establishing Notre Dame in Riverside and the region as significant, relevant, and impactful contributors to the educational landscape of the community;

Principal

The Principal is responsible to the Bishop and Superintendent of Catholic Schools and is the head of the school’s learning environments, partnering with the school President in a shared leadership model to advance the school's mission and vision, and acting as the lead learner among the schools faculty and staff in the daily implementation of the schools mission;

The Principal is responsible for the development and implementation (establishing and maintaining) of exceptional academic and co-curricular programs in a strong Catholic school environment that supports the school's pillars of faith, scholarship, and community and for the creation and support a vibrant student culture enriched by our charism of one heart and one spirit, cor unum et anima una.

The Principal recruits and leads a qualified teaching faculty and staff in a collaborative and collegial professional environment in pursuit of the schools mission and provides leadership, support, and professional development to ensure innovative learning environments that result in meeting or exceeding intended student outcomes.

The Principal is responsible for the management of school resources as prescribed by the annual budget and monthly cashflow with an emphasis on fiscal stewardship and provides oversight of the day to day operations necessary for efficient and effective service to families and students.

The Principal establishes and maintains strong and meaningful relationships with school partners which include parents, partner schools, alumni, and community supporters.

School Symbols

Crest

The Notre Dame Crest is represented by a shield, a symbol of strength and protection.  The two colors of the crest are green and gold.  Green represents life, renewal, charity and hope, vibrancy and success, and human endeavors.  Gold represents wealth and prosperity, knowledge and learning, confidence and optimism, and heavenly pursuits.

The dove is the representation of the ever-present Holy Spirit and the interlocking initials of Notre Dame represent the three-dimensionality of being grounded in faith, active in scholarship, and engaged in community.

Our motto is emblazoned on a banner, Cor Unum et Anima Una, which means One Heart, One Spirit, the fundamental charism of our school community rooted in the Acts of the Apostles, Acts 4:32.

The crest is closely associated with our scholastic and spiritual identity and is used in formal applications.  

School Colors

Notre Dame Green and Titan Gold are best reflected in our Notre Dame Varsity Letter.  Notre Dame Green can be described as dark green or forest green.  Titan Gold can be described as athletic gold or “old gold” and is close to yellow-orange.

Interlocking “ND”

The interlocking “ND” is generally represented in Notre Dame Green and Titan Gold, with a three-dimensional appearance in the form of blocking.  The letters are drawn in a collegial style with serifs.  The interlocking “ND” is closely associated with our athletic programs and with informal applications.

Titans

The school nickname is "TITANS”, the earliest of the Greek gods, denoting power and strength.  

Alma Mater

Notre Dame’s Alma Mater is sung by the Notre Dame faculty, staff, students, alumni and parents in a show of solidarity and respect during sporting events, assemblies and graduation.  The words speak of our love and respect for one another and our recognition of the love and respect of the Holy Mother of Christ for whom our school is named.

The music of the Alma Mater is taken from Beethoven’s 9th Symphony, the fourth movement known as the “Ode to Joy.”  The following words are sung with the right hand raised and the index finger pointing to the Alma Mater banner in the gym, the image of the Holy Mother when in church, or to the heavens when no such image is near:

    Hail, all Hail, to Our Lady
    Standing, Guarding over thee.
    Hail, all Hail, to Notre Dame

    You stand in greatest majesty.
    Our school stands in high esteem;
    It leads us to our eminent dream.

    Sing our love to Alma Mater
    Hail to thee, O Notre Dame!                       

-Written by Cathy Loera, Class of 1979. (Sung to the melody: "Ode to Joy" by L. von Beethoven)